technology

Music is stagnating, are neoliberalism and the gig economy to blame?

A crowd lights a bonfire of disco records at Comiskey Park

Progress in music is slowing down, a look at how neoliberalism and developments in music production and distribution may be to blame

Soldering on: report on working in a 3D-printer manufacturing plant in London

The first part of the article looks at the current hype around automation and post-industrialism. The second part looks at the concrete conditions in the west London factory, which largely employs female migrant workers.

Captain Swing was here!

An example of a Captain Swing letter

A short history of the 1830 Swing riots by Stuart Booth. Farm bosses would receive threatening letters from a fictional “Captain Swing”, and if they didn’t submit to the demands their premises would be attacked.

The Luddites: machine-breaking in regency England

Cartoon depicting the fictional Luddite leader Ned Ludd

A historical overview and analysis of the Luddite movement 1811-1816 which swept parts of the UK as workers smashed machines to defend their jobs, pay and conditions.

Who were the Luddites?

Illustration of a Luddite

A brief overview of the Luddite movement: militant textile workers in the UK who fought against job losses and deskilling brought about by the industrialisation of the industry.

Technological despotism - Ian Tillium

An attempt to analyse technological innovations from a working class perspective in the early 1990s.

The “gig economy”: Some cursory thoughts and link dump

Despite being a generally annoying term, the “gig economy” does signify some major shifts in class composition and the strategies of capital. But what should it mean for us as radicals?

Luxury communism tumblr

Drone communism

Archive of the Luxury Communism blog, examining possibilities for a libertarian communist future with luxury for all. Active 2012-2015.

The nuclearization of the world - Jaime Semprun

In this Swiftian “nuclearist manifesto” first published in France in 1980, the author uses “laughable sophistry” and “black humor” “disguised as apologetics” in the “spurious defense” of a “program” to save the State and the status quo by “nuclearizing” the world, ridiculing “emotional” opposition to nuclear power, exposing the widespread “mistrust” of “specialists” as a “revolt of the ignorant”, calling attention to the many (non-economic) advantages of nuclearization, and concluding with a proposal to merge the police and the trade unions for the “self-management” of the security and social control functions that will be indispensable in a nuclearized world.